Category Archives: Essays

Recent Release Review- Nearing 90 by Judith Viorst

Nearing 90

Title: Nearing 90: And Other Comedies of Late Life ( Judith Viorst’s Decades)

Genre: Poetry/Essay

Author: Judith Viorst

Publisher: Simon & Schuster, April 2019

Source: Free for review from the publisher

Pages: 96

Rating: 4

Sexy Rating: 3

Violence Rating: 0

Description from Amazon.com:

n Nearing Ninety, bestselling author Judith Viorst candidly shares the complicated joys and everyday tribulations that await us at the age of ninety, all with a large dose of humor and an understanding that nothing—well, almost nothing—in life should be taken too seriously. While she struggles to make it to midnight on New Year’s Eve, while she’s starting to hear more eulogies than symphonies, while she’ll forever be disheartened by what she weighs (and forever unable to stop weighing herself), there is plenty to cherish at ninety: hanging out with the people she loves. Playing a relentless game of Scrabble. And still sleeping tush-to-tush with the same man to whom she’s been married for sixty years.

Accompanied by Laura Gibson’s whimsical illustrations, Nearing Ninety’s amusing and touching reflections make this collection relatable to readers of all ages. With the wisdom and spunk of someone who’s seen it all, Viorst gently reminds us that everybody gets old, and that the best medicine at any age is laughter.

**
Alas, I had no illustrations to accompany my Kindle edition of this delightful book. Regardless I still enjoyed it immensely. Ms. Viorst has written one of these poetry/essay books for each of her decades of life. This one is full of sweet reminiscence and tender feelings for her husband of 60 years. If I should be fortunate to near ninety than I hope my life will be as rewarding as Ms. Viorst’s. A lovely book that can be read in an afternoon, only 96 pages, and then savored whenever one is feeling down about aging.

Leave a comment

Filed under Book review, Essays, Poetry

Recent Release Review- Heyer Society: Essays on The Literary Genius of Georgette Heyer

Heyer Society

Title: Heyer Society: Essays on the Literary Genius of Georgette Heyer
Genre: Literary Criticism
Author: Rachel Hyland,editor
Publisher: Overlord Publishing, Nov. 27, 2018
Source: Free for review from the publisher
Pages: 176
Rating: 4
Sexy Rating: not applicable
Violence Rating: not applicable
Description from Amazon.com:
Featuring contributions from renowned Heyer biographer Jennifer Kloester, heading up a talented team of Heyer devotees, this far-ranging and thought-provoking collection considers topics as diverse as intimacy, privilege, historical accuracy and contemporary analysis, along with looks at Heyer’s influences, and the many writers – and readers – she continues to influence worldwide.
By turns learned, personal, insightful and irreverent, the dozens of essays herein exult in the unparalleled genius of this true nonpareil.

Including:

1. Georgette Heyer’s Literary Genius, by Jennifer Kloester
2. A Most Excellent Influence – Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer, by Susannah Fullarton
3. From Arabella to Venetia – Growing Up with Heyer’s Heroines by Rachel Hyland
4. The Heyer Problem – Privilege in Regency Romance, by Cat Sebastian
5. Marks of Distinction – Heyer’s Mark I and Mark II Heroes by Janga
6. Beauvallet: My First Romance Novel Boyfriend, by Donna Cummings
7. Heyer’s Kissing Cousins, by Ruth Williamson
8. What I Owe to Georgette Heyer, by Cheryl Bolen
9. ‘Bath Tangle’ in the Social Media Age, by Anne-Marie Turenne
10. Fathers in Heyer, by Janet Webb
11. The Grand Sophy: Matchmaker or Master Manipulator? by Jennifer Proffitt
12. Reluctantly Watching ‘The Reluctant Widow’ – Heyer on Film, by Rachel Hyland
13. Splash, Dash and Finesse! – Heyer’s Magical Pen and Indomitable Spirit on Display in ‘The Masqueraders,’ by Kathleen Baldwin
14. Hearing Heyer – How Audiobooks Breed a New Appreciation by Karen Zachary
15. Learning! with Georgette Heyer, by Clara Shipman
16. The Mystery of ‘Penhallow,’ by Madeline Paschen
17. Behind Closed Doors – Sex in Georgette Heyer, by Anna Bradley
18. Reading ‘The Great Roxhythe’ – The Lost Heyer Historical, by Rachel Hyland
19. Beaux, Belles and Black Sheep – Georgette Heyer in Bath, by Kirsten Elliott
20. Coming Back to Heyer – How I Came to Appreciate the Slow Burn, by Megan Osmond
21. The Lost Contemporaries: ‘Helen,’ ‘Pastel,’ ‘Instead of the Thorn’ and ‘Barren Corn,’ by Maura Tan
22. Gambling in Heyer, by Rachel Hyland
23. The Apple and the Tree – Georgette Heyer and the Black Dagger Brotherhood, by Kate Nagy
24. Was Georgette Heyer a Snob, and Does it Matter? by Tabetha Waite
25. Heyer’s Heirs – What to Read After Georgette, by Amanda Jones

Plus our contributors weigh in on their favorite Heyer novels, heroes and heroines, along with their firsts and their worsts.

A must for any Heyer fan!
**
Confession time, I have not read a Georgette Heyer book. I accepted this book for review hoping it would encourage me to delve into this renowned author’s work. The answer to that is yes… and no. Yes, because the enthusiasm of these authors is positively catching. No, because I really need to reread these opinion essays AFTER I read Heyer’s novels. If you have read Heyer’s books then I am certain these essays will mean a lot to you and if you are like me, you will be excited about reading Heyer’s romances. Each essay is thoughtful, some literary and some are love letters to the lady and the genre. Many delve into characters and compare them, such as mentions of cousins across the books or siblings relationships to one another. None of the essays are overly long. This book is certainly a must-read for Heyer fans.

 

4 Comments

Filed under Book review, Books, Essays, Historical Romance

Release Day Review- I Wrote This Book Because I Love You by Tim Kreider

I wrote this Book because I love you

Title: I Wrote This Book Because I Love You: Essays
Genre: Nonfiction Essays
Author: Tim Kreider
Source: Free for review from the publisher
Publisher: Simon and Schuster, Feb. 6, 2018
Pages: 224
Rating: 5
Sexy rating: 0
Violence rating: 0
Description from Amazon:

Psychologists have told him he’s a psychologist. Philosophers have told him he’s a philosopher. Religious groups have invited him to speak. He had a cult following as a cartoonist. But, above all else, Tim Kreider is an essayist—one whose deft prose, uncanny observations, dark humor, and emotional vulnerability have earned him deserved comparisons to David Sedaris, Sarah Vowell, and the late David Foster Wallace (who was himself a fan of Kreider’s humor).

In his new collection, I Wrote This Book Because I Love You, he focuses his unique perception and wit on his relationships with women—romantic, platonic, and the murky in-between. He talks about his difficulty finding lasting love, and seeks to understand his commitment issues by tracking down the John Hopkins psychologist who tested him for a groundbreaking study on attachment when he was a toddler. He talks about his valued female friendships, one of which landed him on a circus train bound for Mexico. He talks about his time teaching young women at an upstate New York college, and the profound lessons they wound up teaching him. And in a hugely popular essay that originally appeared in The New York Times, he talks about his nineteen-year-old cat, wondering if it’s the most enduring relationship he’ll ever have.

Each of these pieces is hilarious and profound, and collectively they further cement Kreider’s place among the best essayists working today.

**
You may wonder after reading the book description if I would have anything new to say about the book. The answer is, not really. I agree that this book is profound and hilarious and Tim Kreider has lived a most interesting life with his romantic and platonic relationships. Each essay gave insight into this man’s thinking but he also touched most frequently on universal truths of human relationships; observations we can all relate to our own lives. The women in his life were all different with some strong similarities. They were smart and adventurous. No shrinking violets here. I highly recommend this book!

( A really horrible cover!!)

Leave a comment

Filed under Book review, Books, E-Book, Essays